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Parker pony truss bridge

The skewed, 1 span, 146'-long, riveted Parker pony truss bridge has built-up chords and rolled I section web members. The end posts are vertical, not sloped, as is characteristic of most Parker trusses of this period. The gusset plates have been shaped to have curvilinear edges, rather than straight edges, giving them a "webbed" appearance. The bridge has rolled floor beams, stringer, and a concrete deck. The deck was replaced in 1985 and safety shape barriers placed to the roadway faces of the trusses. The bridge is supported on concrete abutments with U-shaped wingwalls finished with balustrades.

Integrity:

The bridge was rehabilitated in 1985. Summary of Significance: The Parker pony truss was fabricated by the Mt. Vernon Bridge Co. for the state highway department in 1935. It is a well-proportioned, although technologically late, example of the bridge type/design. It has nice aesthetic detailing, including the gusset plates and wingwalls. It speaks well of the bridge bureau's attention to design under the leadership of D. H. Overman. There is a similar thru truss in Richland County on SR 13 (7000243). The bridge was rehabilitated in 1985, which included replacing the deck. The project does not appear to have diminished the integrity or the ability of the bridge to convey its significance, and it was approved with no adverse effect by the SHPO. The prior inventory included the bridge in the reserve pool. It is recommended eligible. Camelback and Parker trusses are members of the Pratt-family of trusses with sloped top chords Technologically, Camelback and Parker trusses differ only in the number of top chord slopes (Camelbacks have exactly five slopes, and Parkers have more than five slopes.) The sloped-chord trusses provide the greatest depth at midspan where it is needed to accommodate the stresses, meaning that less material is needed in their construction as compared to a parallel chord truss of similar span, but fabrication is made more difficult due to the varying lengths of the members. The sloped-chord trusses are often associated with longer spans where the savings in material is great enough to be worth the additional fabrication costs. The practice of sloping the top chords dates to at least the 1840s and appeared early in the development of metal trusses. As with other truss designs, pin connections were used from the 1870s to 1900s, and mostly phased out during the 1910s. Rivet connections were being used by the early 1900s and were prevalent from the 1910s to 1940s. Standardized rivet-connected Camelback and Parker designs were used by many state highway departments, including the Ohio State Highway Department.

Preserved:

Bridge has been saved and preserved by the City of Hilliard for reuse on a rail trail project.

1935/Ohio State Highway Department/Mt. Vernon Bridge Co.19856501567

​Pony Truss
Design: Parker (Riveted)
Material: Steel Railing Type: Safety Shape Barriers
Source: ODOT Inspection Files

​Overall length: 161 feet
Out to Width: 25.5 feet
Roadway Width: 24 feet

​Tom Barrett
614-466-3932
tom.barrett@dot.state.oh.us

YesClick here
  
Caldwell Road Bridge

​Located in Dallas Township, Township Route 33 (Caldwell Road) over the Sandusky River. Currently closed to traffic

1890/Variety Iron Works173820

Pratt through truss with pin connections​

114 feet long
16 feet wide​

​Crawford County Engineers Office
815 Whetstone Street
Bucyrus, Ohio 44820
419-562-7731

NoClick here
  
Woodside Road Bridge

Located in Texas Township Route 193 (Woodside Road) over Sycamore Creek in Crawford County.​

circa 1900/builder unknown1743910

Pratt pony truss bridge with pin connections​

52 feet long
16 feed wide​

​Crawford County Engineers Office
815 Whetstone Street
Bucyrus, Ohio 44820
419-562-7731

NoClick here
  
Benton Road Bridge

With help from Vern Messler of http://www.historicbridgerestoration.com/, this structure will be restored and reused for vehicles in Twin Lakes, Lake County Colorado. A website dedicated to the bridge is forthcoming from the new bridge owners.  Located in Texas Township, Township Route 104 (Benton Rd.) over Sycamore Creek. This bridge has been determined eligible ​for the National Register of Historic places by ODOT, FHWA and the Ohio Historic Preservation Office as a representative example of Warren pony trusses.

1925/Brookville Bridge Company, Brookville, Ohio1743961

Warren polygonal chord pony truss​

92 feet long
17 feed wide​

​Crawford County Engineers Office
815 Whetstone Street
Bucyrus, Ohio 44820
419-562-7731

YesClick here
  
Fairview-Snodgrass Bridge

Fairview-Snodgrass (Township Route 19) over Spring Creek. This bridge was scheduled for replacement in 2010. It is now being relocated to the City of Piqua for reuse on a bikeway. Thanks to Doug Christian, P.E., P.S., the Miami County Engineer and the City of Piqua for their efforts in finding a way to preserve this structure.​ For more information and to view more pictures, download the Nomination Form.

1913/builder unknown5531055

Pratt pinned pony steel truss​

66 feet long
15.9 feed wide​

N/A​

YesClick here
  
Pratt Pony Truss

Only part of Truss still available, and in storage.​

unknown8233209

Pratt pony truss​

60 feet long​

​Brain Reedy
Vinton County Engineer's Office
740-596-5144

NoClick here
  
Bennington Harmon Road Bridge

Bennington Harmon Road (TR-191) over Big Walnut Creek in rural Morrow County.​ This small pony truss has some unusual outriggers.

Unknown/Unknown5930634

Metal 3 Panel Pin-Connected Pratt Half-Hip Pony Truss, Fixed​

48 feet long
13.8 feet wide
Main spans: 1​

Thomas P. Barrett, Environmental Specialist
Cultural Resources/Historic Bridges
Office of Environmental Services
Division of Planning
Ohio Department of Transportation
1980 West Broad St. Columbus Ohio 43223
614-466-3932
tom.barrett@dot.state.oh.us

NoClick here
  
Cardington Denmark Road Bridge

​Cardington Denmark Road (TR-132) over Shaw Creek in rural Morrow County. This bridge was built by a bridge builder who was prolific insome states, but not in Ohio.

Unknown//Virginia Bridge and Iron Company of Roanoke, Virginia5931568

​Metal 4 Panel Pin-Connected Pratt Half-Hip Pony Truss, Fixed

64 feet long
13.5 feet wide
Main spans: 1​

Thomas P. Barrett, Environmental Specialist
Cultural Resources/Historic Bridges
Office of Environmental Services
Division of Planning
Ohio Department of Transportation
1980 West Broad St. Columbus Ohio 43223
614-466-3932
tom.barrett@dot.state.oh.us

NoClick here
  
Curl Road Bridge

Curl Road (TR-138) over Shaw Creek in rural Morrow County. One of several noteworthy small but very old pony truss bridges in this county built by the Massillon Bridge Company

unknown/Virginia Bridge and Iron Company of Roanoke, Virginia5931339

Metal 4 Panel Pin-Connected Pratt Half-Hip Pony Truss, Fixed​

51 feet long
13.5 feet wide
Main Spans: 1

Thomas P. Barrett, Environmental Specialist
Cultural Resources/Historic Bridges
Office of Environmental Services
Division of Planning
Ohio Department of Transportation
1980 West Broad St. Columbus Ohio 43223
614-466-3932
tom.barrett@dot.state.oh.us

 

NoClick here
  
Curtis Road Bridge

Curtis Road (CR-137) over Shaw Creek in rural Morrow County. ​Although small, this is an outstanding example of a pony truss built by the Massillon Bridge Company.

1888/Massillon Bridge Company, Massillon, Ohio5931282

​Metal 4 Panel Pin-Connected Pratt Half-Hip Pony Truss, Fixed

​46 feet long
13.8 feet wide
Main Spans: 1

Thomas P. Barrett, Environmental Specialist
Cultural Resources/Historic Bridges
Office of Environmental Services
Division of Planning
Ohio Department of Transportation
1980 West Broad St. Columbus Ohio 43223
614-466-3932
tom.barrett@dot.state.oh.us

NoClick here
  
Phillips Road Bridge

​Phillips Road (TR-161) over Alum Creek rural Morrow County. This is a small, traditionally composed pony truss.

Unknown/Unknown5931622

Metal 3 Panel Pin-Connected Pratt Half-Hip Pony Truss, Fixed​

​42 feet long
11.8 feet wide
Main Spans: 1

Thomas P. Barrett, Environmental Specialist
Cultural Resources/Historic Bridges
Office of Environmental Services
Division of Planning
Ohio Department of Transportation
1980 West Broad St. Columbus Ohio 43223
614-466-3932
tom.barrett@dot.state.oh.us

NoClick here
  
Pompey Road Bridge

Pompey Road (TR-166) over Turkey Run. This small bridge has some alterations, but retains its historical charm.​

Unknown/Unknown5932238

Metal 3 Panel Pin-Connected Pratt Half-Hip Pony Truss, Fixed

​47 feet long
13.8 feet wide
Main Spans: 1

Thomas P. Barrett, Environmental Specialist
Cultural Resources/Historic Bridges
Office of Environmental Services
Division of Planning
Ohio Department of Transportation
1980 West Broad St. Columbus Ohio 43223
614-466-3932
tom.barrett@dot.state.oh.us

NoClick here
  
Prospect Mount Vernon Road Bridge

Prospect Mount Vernon Road (CR-21) over Alum Creek in rural Morrow County, Ohio. This is a traditionally composed full slope Pratt pony truss.​

Unknown/Unknown5932440

Metal 5 Panel Pin-Connected Pratt Full-Slope Pony Truss, Fixed​

63 feet long
12 feet wide
Main Spans: 1​

Thomas P. Barrett, Environmental Specialist
Cultural Resources/Historic Bridges
Office of Environmental Services
Division of Planning
Ohio Department of Transportation
1980 West Broad St. Columbus Ohio 43223
614-466-3932
tom.barrett@dot.state.oh.us

YesClick here
  
Pony Truss Camelback Riveted

​The 99-foot single span camelback (riveted) pony truss installed on a 6 degree skew is the only known one of its kind in Ohio. The truss has a slender profile, constructed of an arched built up top cord and rolled double L-shaped bottom cord. The bridge has elegant vertical members connecting the top and bottom cords at all floor beam connections and a chevron pattern of larger built up diagonal members. The entire stucture is constructed of steel with corrugated galvanized steel asphalt filled deck resting on 5-steel stringers and 7-floor beams. Built circa 1900 the bridge is in fair condition for its age. It is installed high off the water and on a unsalted roadway.

Integrity: This is the only truss of its kind known in the state. Teh bridge was rehabilitated in 1997, during this rehab the decking was removed and new steel back walls and stringers were installed. The project does not appear to have diminished the integrity or the ability of the bridge to convey its significance. Camelback and Parker trusses differ only in the number of top chord slopes (Camelbacks have exactly five slopes, and Parkers have more than five slopes). The sloped-chord trusses provide the greatest depth at midspan where it is needed to accommodate the stresses, meaning that less materials is needed in their construction as compared to a parallel chord truss of similar span, but fabrication is made more difficult due to the varying lengths of the members. The sloped-chord trusses are often associated with longer spans where the savings in material is great enough to be worth the additional fabrication costs. The practice of sloping the top chords dates to at least the 1840s and appeared early in the development of metal trusses. As with othe truss designs, pin connections were used from the 1870s to 1900, and mostly phased out during the 1910s to 1940s. Standardized rivet-connected Camelback and Parker designs were used by many state highway departments, including the Ohio State Highway Department. It appears the bridge was originally designed for HS-15 loading. Based on load rating analysis completed in 2011. The floor beams connections control the load rating and the gusset plates do not meet current minimum requirement. The structure is currently posted for 15 tons for a 5C1 vehicle.

 
Circa 1900/Builder Unknown19976032613

Pony Truss​ Camelback Riveted

​100-6ft overall length
17.9-ft roadway width

Thomas P. Barrett, Environmental Specialist
Cultural Resources/Historic Bridges
Office of Environmental Services
Mail Stop 4170, 3rd Floor
Division of Planning
Ohio Department of Transportation
1980 West Broad St. Columbus Ohio 43223
614-466-3932
tom.barrett@dot.state.oh.us

 

NoClick here
  
US Route 36 Camelback Rivited Thru Truss two center spans

The bridge currently carries a 2 lane US highway over the Tuscarawas River south of Gnadenhutten. It is paralleled by a similar 2-span thru truss railroad bridge.

The 4 span, 509'-long bridge has two rivet-connected Camelback thru truss main spans (220 ft long each and 34 ft wide) flanked by steel stringer approach spans (30’ each). The trusses are composed of rolled sections for the web members and built-up sections for the chords. It has cantilevered sidewalks with state-standard metal panel railings.
 

The bridge is available as one individual truss span if that is all that is needed at a new location (approx. 200’).  Any interested parties will have to contact us no later than 03/01/15.  We anticipate the bridge will be available for pick-up between 04/01 – 06/30 2016.  The salvaged bridge components will include the bridge truss components but no deck.

Additional information:

1949/American Bridge Co.1994 with new deck7900333

Camelback​ Riveted Thru Truss (two truss spans)

​Each of the two thru truss spans are:

220 ft. long

34 ft. roadway width

Thomas P. Barrett, Environmental Specialist
Cultural Resources/Historic Bridges
Office of Environmental Services
Mail Stop 4170, 3rd Floor
Division of Planning
Ohio Department of Transportation
1980 West Broad St. Columbus Ohio 43223
614-466-3932
tom.barrett@dot.state.oh.us

 

NoClick here
  
Marion 141 Truss (St James Road Bridge)

The complete bridge is available for immediate use. It is currently being stored at the Kings Mill Golf Club (40.354800 / 83.022700), with easy access to load onto CR 141. A great opportunity to preserve the National Register of Historic Places-eligible, St. James Road Bridge, a Parker pin-connected, thru truss bridge, which carried County Route 141 (St. James Road) over the Olentangy River in Richland Township, Marion County.

The bridge dates to about 1905 and was moved to this location as part of a WPA project in the 1937. The ca. 1905 pin-connected Parker thru truss bridge ranks as 1 of the 2 oldest examples of the Parker or Camelback design in Ohio [NB -- the oldest (SFN 07XXXX1, 1893) in Belmont County over the Ohio River Back Channel (owned by WVDOT) is slated to be demolished later this year]. It is technologically significant as on Ohio's most complete surviving examples of a sloped-chord, long-span, pin-connected highway truss bridge with typical period detailing (Criterion C). Although the truss bridge is dated 1937 by a plaque, the bridge's steel truss superstructure actually dates ca. 1900 by style, design of its members, pin connections, and its 16' deck width. According to county records, the bridge was relocated here from State Route 4 (Marysville-Marion Road) over the Scioto River in 1937. Marysville-Marion Road was taken into the state highway system as State Route 115 about 1911 and renamed State Route 4 about 1921. County highway maps from 1914 and 1919 show a bridge crossing the Scioto River at that location. The truss bridge was in all likelihood originally a county bridge prior to being taken into the state system in 1911. It was returned to county ownership when it was relocated in 1937. The salvage and relocation of old truss bridges was (and still is) a common practice, and this portability was one of the "selling points" of the technology. The original date of construction and fabricator are not noted by available records. The Parker design, with its polygonal upper chords, which save material and concentrate depth at the center of the center of the trusses where it is needed, is used because of the nearly 200' length of the span.

19051937 relocated by WPA5132428

Parker Pin-connected Thru Truss

193 ft in overall length 16 ft wide

​Thomas Barrett, Environmental Specialist
Cultural Resources/Historic Bridges
Office of Environmental Services
Mail Stop 4170, 3rd Floor
Division of Planning
Ohio Department of Transportation
1980 West Broad St. Columbus, OH 43223
Tom.Barrett@dot.ohio.gov
(614) 466-3932

NoClick here
  
Muskingum County Route 32 Bridge

​The available bridge is composed of 4, 157' long Parker thru truss approach spans and an approximately 200' long, center rim bearing, Parker thru truss swing span that is at the south end of the bridge over the 1893 canal lock 9 chamber.  The trusses are traditionally composed with built up box section chords and rolled section web members and bracing.

1953 Ohio State Highway Department/American Bridge Company19796054129

4 Parker Riveted through Truss spans​

Three 157' spans
One 200' span
26 feet wide

Tom Barrett
Tom.Barrett@dot.ohio.gov
(614) 466-3932​

NoClick here
  
Toledo terminal Railroad Bridge

​Seven deck trusses (170 ft. ea) and one through truss (250 ft.) available.

1902 American Bridge Co. Designed by J.A.L. WaddellClosed in 1982

Metal Rivet-Connected Pratt Through TrussMovable: Swing(Rim Bearing Center Pier) and Approach Spans: Metal 6 Panel Rivet-Connected Pratt Deck Truss, Fixed

 

​Seven spans 1,450 feet; 250 feet .

​Thomas Barrrett
Historic Bridge Program Manager and State Byways Coordinator
ODOT Office of Environment Services
thomas.barrett@dot.ohoi.gov
(614) 466-3932

 

NoPhoto