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‚ÄčDivision of Planning
Office of Environmental Services
Cultural Resources

Under the Assistant Environmental Administrator (the Section head), the OES Cultural Resource Section is composed of two sub-sections: Archaeology and History/Architecture. The Section staff are composed of both permanent employees and college interns. Our primary responsibilities are to efficiently and effectively assist in the timely delivery of projects that comprise ODOT's Transportation Improvement Program. In addition, our responsibilities include monitoring the application of State and Federal laws in the evaluation of the impacts of transportation projects on Ohio's cultural resources. "Cultural Resources" include prehistoric and historic archaeological sites, historic bridges, and historic buildings, sites and districts.

Our staff conducts field surveys and compose the resulting reports for coordination with the Ohio Historic Preservation Office and the Ohio Historical Society. We also review and coordinate reports compiled under contract by pre-qualified consultants who are working on transportation projects. Our staff works closely with the consulting community and environmental staffs in all of ODOT's twelve districts to ensure that all projects go through the proper reviews and evaluations. The entire staff reflects a broad range of education and experience, with a balanced table of organization that allows several people to work on teams in both sub-sections.

 

 Serpent Mound

 
Serpent Mound, Adams County, Ohio

Atop a plateau overlooking the Brush Creek Valley in Adams County, Ohio, Serpent Mound is the largest and finest serpent effigy in the United States. Nearly a quarter of a mile long, Serpent Mound apparently represents an uncoiling serpent.

In the late nineteenth-century Harvard University archaeologist Frederic Ward Putnam excavated Serpent Mound and attributed the creation of the effigy to the builders of the two nearby burial mounds, which he also excavated. We now refer to this culture as the Adena (800 BC-AD 100). A third burial mound at the park and a village site near the effigy's tail belong to the Fort Ancient culture (AD 1000-1550).

A more recent excavation of Serpent Mound revealed wood charcoal that could be radiocarbon dated. Test results show that the charcoal dates to the Fort Ancient culture. This new evidence of the serpent's creators links the effigy to the elliptical mound and the village rather than the conical burial mounds.

The head of the serpent is aligned to the summer solstice sunset and the coils also may point to the winter solstice sunrise and the equinox sunrise. Today, visitors may walk along a footpath surrounding the serpent and experience the mystery and power of this monumental effigy. A public park for more than a century, Serpent Mound attracts visitors from all over the world. The museum contains exhibits on the effigy mound and the geology of the surrounding area.

 

 Davis-Shai House

 

The Davis-Shai House in Heath, Ohio, was built in 1861 by Jackson Davis and sold in 1945 to the Shai family. First located at Hebron Road and 30th Street, the historic house was moved in 1996 to its present address, 301 Central Parkway to accomodate commercial expansion. The 147-year old Davis-Shai House stands today as an example of Ohio's commitment to preservation while fostering progress. Visit the official Davis-Shai House website to learn more.

 

 Section 106 Toolkit

 
Go to Class Toolkit
Please visit the Section 106 Toolkit site for all things related to the Section 106 process.
 

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Design Reference Resource Center logo To ensure you receive updates to the Office of Environmental Services manuals, subscribe to our listserv through the Design Reference Resource Center under Section E.
 

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