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March 1, 2017
 
Ohio Department of Transportation District 1
Winter Operations Update
 
The following is an update regarding snow and ice operations on state highways within the Ohio Department of Transportation District 1 which includes the counties of Allen, Defiance, Hancock, Hardin, Paulding, Putnam, Van Wert and Wyandot. This report is issued periodically during the winter months and as necessary following snow and ice events.
 
This report represents October to the present:


Snow and Ice Operations Totals – Winter Season (to date)
County
Total Lane Miles Maintained
Salt Used (tons)
Deicing Liquids Used
(gallons)
Miles Driven for Snow and Ice
Total Cost (labor, equipment, material)
Allen
474
5,743
52,167
51,247
$609,872
Defiance
340
2,452
30,588
46,100
$405,674
Hancock
572
4,861
171,111
63,638
$529,134
Hardin
309
2,585
21,845
35,176
$410,702
Paulding
387
3,344
18,501
45,324
$424,143
Putnam
396
2,993
24,760
48,692
$423,053
Van Wert
393
3,156
24,620
31,636
$430,612
Wyandot
489
4,064
29,910
49,964
$528,002
 
District 1 totals year to date
 
29,198
 
 
373,502
 
371,777
 
$3,761,193
 
 
 
 
 
Additional facts:
 
-Total amount of salt on hand throughout the eight-county region of ODOT District 1 is currently at 31,139 tons.
 
-At this same point in the season last year, 16,686 tons of salt had been used and $2,654,990 had been spent on snow and ice operations in the district.
 
-Statewide, ODOT has used 487,630 tons of salt this winter, well under the 10-year average of 656,928 tons.
 
Did you know . . .
 
Perhaps you’ve noticed this year the enhanced brightness of the lights on some of our trucks. Much of the state’s truck fleet this winter is equipped with heated, LED plow lights.

LED lights have been used in the past. “The drivers would complain because an LED doesn’t put out any heat,” said Mark Yost, automotive technician at the ODOT Wyandot County garage.

During snow and ice events, operators would often stop to clear off the snow accumulation on their lights. The standard bulbs used in the past would generate enough heat to keep them clear, he said.
 
The new LED lights are mounted on the plow light bracket and feature an electrical grid on the lens which conducts the heat, much like how the grid on the back window of your car works, said Yost. The reliability of the light is remarkable. “With LEDs, they just don’t burn out,” said Yost, adding the light assembly includes a turn signal lens, also with an LED bulb.
Mark Yost, automotive technician at the ODOT Wyandot County garage, adjusts a heated, LED light on one of the trucks in the Wyandot fleet.
The level of brightness between the old standard bulb and the LEDs is stark, said Yost, who has himself plowed with the lights. “They are really, really bright. All around a better visibility light,” he said.
 
The lights are being installed generally on trucks year 2007 and newer and on older trucks if requested by the driver, said Yost.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
For more information contact:
Rhonda Pees, Public Information Officer, at (419) 999-6803
or email
D01.PIO@dot.state.oh.us