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The Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) will host an informational meeting about the State Route 32 Relocation project on Wednesday, Nov. 14 at 6 p.m. This meeting is being held to give local residents an additional opportunity to learn more about the proposed relocation of SR 32, the project's purpose and background, and the project development and decision making process. Also discussed will be current project status, recent project corridor recommendations and next steps.
 
WHAT:
SR 32 Relocation Community Information & Project Orientation Meeting               
 
WHEN:
Wednesday Nov. 14, 2012 
6 to 8 p.m.
 
WHERE: 
Mariemont Elementary School Auditorium
6750 Wooster Pike 
Cincinnati, OH 45227 
 
WHO:  
ODOT representatives                
Hamilton County representatives
SR 32 project team representatives
Interested community members
 
"We are holding this meeting as a follow up to several public involvement meetings held this summer," said Steve Mary, Deputy Director for ODOT District 8. "We've since received many questions and comments and we think it is important to go back out to the community, continue the conversation and talk about how to move forward." 
 
About the SR 32 Relocation Project
From the intersection of SR 32 and I-275 and extending west, the SR 32 Relocation project would shift the roadway from its current alignment to a new connection with US 50 (Columbia Parkway) and the Red Bank business corridor. The new road is being planned in conjunction with portions of the Oasis Rail Transit corridor and would include accommodations for bicyclists and pedestrians. A new clear-span bridge would be built to cross the Little Miami River. The purpose of the project is to improve access and mobility along SR 32, increase safety and decrease travel times, and decrease growing congestion on local roads and highways.
The vision for the relocated SR 32 is not a highway like I-71, but rather a road that looks and feels more like a boulevard or parkway - two lanes traveling in each direction, a grassy or landscaped median in the middle, and possibly trees or other aesthetic treatments lining the road. A bicycle and pedestrian path would travel along one side and portions of the Oasis line could travel along the other. Traffic signals placed at key intervals along the road's corridor would manage speed and access on and off the roadway.  
 

The meeting format will allow for a presentation by project representatives, as well as a question-and-answer session from community members.